Here’s what we did this week

Here’s what we did this week

By Graham Ruthven

As usual, it was another busy week in Scottish football. We wouldn’t have it any other way. And that means it’s been a busy week at TheTwoPointOne. There’s been a lot to talk and write about and we have tried our best to do exactly that.

 

Celtic were in Russia to face Zenit St Petersburg for a place in the last 16 of the Europa League. Of course, the Hoops would return from Russia with no love, crashing out with a disappointing 3-0 defeat. There was a lot to pick over from the game.

 

Plus, we continued to reflect on the appointment of Alex McLeish as the new Scotland manager. Because, once again, there’s a lot to pick over there. We also spoke to the man who saves Scottish football clubs and asked Stirling Albion manager Dave Mackay what it’s like to start out as a young manager in the lower leagues.

 

Take a look at some of the best stuff we published over the past seven days. There’s no paywall here, no subscription needed to access, so fill ‘yer boots!

 


 

How the fall of communism hurt the Scotland national team

 

 

We’ve all been asking ourselves for years – what happened to the Scotland national team? We used to qualify for major tournaments with clockwork regularity. It was always assumed that The Tartan Army would make an appearance at World Cups and European Championships. So what happened?

 

Well, the fall of communism happened, that’s what. James Cairney looked at how the demise of the Soviet Union contributed to the decline of the Scotland national team. There is a direct correlation. Honestly, there is. Let us explain it.

 


 

How did Celtic lose 3-0 to Zenit St Petersburg?

 

 

It was a difficult night for the Scottish champions in the Russian cold. Brendan Rodgers and his team had hopes of progressing to the last 16 of the Europa League following their first leg win over Zenit St Petersburg, but those hopes were left in tatters after Thursday night’s defeat.

 

So what went so badly wrong? Did Rodgers make a mess of his tactics? Of his team selection? Were Celtic simply shown up by a superior opposition side? What lessons can be learned from this? And what does it say about Rodgers’ progress at the club?

 


 

What it’s like to start out as a young manager in the lower leagues

 

 

It can be difficult to get your start in management. Particularly at the top level, chances for ex-professionals looking for a way into the circuit are few and far between. This is primarily why we’re seeing more and more dropping down the leagues to start out.

 

One such manager is Dave Mackay, the former St Johnstone captain who is now in charge of Stirling Albion. What has he learned from starting out in League Two? How will that serve him well in the future? Does Scottish football have a problem with handing young managers opportunities? Let the man himself explain.

 


 

Depicting the beauty of Scotland’s football stadiums

 

 

Scottish football stadiums are among some of the most distinctive in the world. They might not be state of the art (for the most part), they might not even be sold out all that often, but there can be no denying their idiosyncratic charm.

 

As such, here is some of the work of Steven Stewart, who runs Scottish Football Stadiums Prints. You may have noticed his excellent work on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or through his own website . He explained the idea behind his stadium illustrations.

 


 

The man who saves Scottish football clubs

 

 

Over the past decade or so, there have been countless Scottish clubs who have entered financial difficulty. More often than not, they get out of trouble, even if the process is painful. There is one man charged with saving said clubs more than anyone else – Bryan Jackson.

 

Over the course of his career as an administrator, Jackson has played a major role in saving Dunfermline, Hearts, Clydebank, Clyde, Dundee and Motherwell. So what has he learned about Scottish clubs over the years? Why do they keep ending up in this situation?


 

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